Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://dora.health.qld.gov.au/qldresearchjspui/handle/1/6118
Title: Evaluation of a Project Integrating Financial Incentives into a Hepatitis C Testing and Treatment Model of Care at a Sexual Health Service in Cairns, Australia, 2020-2021
Authors: Dawe, Joshua
Gorton, Carla
Lewis, Rhondda 
Richmond, Jacqueline A
Wilkinson, Anna L
Pedrana, Alisa
Stoové, Mark
Doyle, Joseph S
Russell, Darren 
Issue Date: 2024
Source: Dawe J, Gorton C, Lewis R, Richmond JA, Wilkinson AL, Pedrana A, Stoové M, Doyle JS, Russell D. Evaluation of a Project Integrating Financial Incentives into a Hepatitis C Testing and Treatment Model of Care at a Sexual Health Service in Cairns, Australia, 2020-2021. Viruses. 2024 May 17;16(5):800. doi: 10.3390/v16050800. PMID: 38793681; PMCID: PMC11125761.
Journal Title: Viruses
Journal: Viruses
Abstract: Understanding the effectiveness of novel models of care in community-based settings is critical to achieving hepatitis C elimination. We conducted an evaluation of a hepatitis C model of care with financial incentives that aimed to improve engagement across the hepatitis C cascade of care at a sexual health service in Cairns, Australia. Between March 2020 and May 2021, financial incentives were embedded into an established person-centred hepatitis C model of care at Cairns Sexual Health Service. Clients of the Service who self-reported experiences of injecting drugs were offered an AUD 20 cash incentive for hepatitis C testing, treatment initiation, treatment completion, and test for cure. Descriptive statistics were used to describe retention in hepatitis C care in the incentivised model. They were compared to the standard of care offered in the 11 months prior to intervention. A total of 121 clients received financial incentives for hepatitis C testing (antibody or RNA). Twenty-eight clients were hepatitis C RNA positive, of whom 92% (24/28) commenced treatment, 75% (21/28) completed treatment, and 68% (19/28) achieved a sustained virological response (SVR). There were improvements in the proportion of clients diagnosed with hepatitis C who commenced treatment (86% vs. 75%), completed treatment (75% vs. 40%), and achieved SVR (68% vs. 17%) compared to the pre-intervention comparison period. In this study, financial incentives improved engagement and retention in hepatitis C care for people who inject drugs in a model of care that incorporated a person-centred and flexible approach.
Description: Cairns & Hinterland Hospital and Health Service (CHHHS) affiliated authors: Carla Gorton, Rhondda Lewis, Darren Russell
DOI: 10.3390/v16050800
Keywords: hepatitis C;people who inject drugs;primary care;financial incentives
Type: Article
Appears in Sites:Cairns & Hinterland HHS Publications

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