Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://dora.health.qld.gov.au/qldresearchjspui/handle/1/5095
Title: How immersion in remote Aboriginal communities influences medical students’ career intentions
Authors: Mitchell, Jessica 
Rumbelow, Jack 
Broadley, Amy 
Sharley, Laura 
Osti, Millicent 
Benson, Jill 
Issue Date: 2022
Source: Mitchell, J., Rumbelow, J., Broadley, A., Sharley, L., Osti, M., & Benson, J. (2022). How immersion in remote Aboriginal communities influences medical students’ career intentions. Australian journal of primary health, 28(5), 380–386. https://doi.org/10.1071/PY21120
Journal: Australian journal of primary health
Abstract: The term 'Aboriginal' in this text has been used when referring to Aboriginal peoples living on the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) Lands. The term 'Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander' has been used when referring to the broader community. Background: This project investigated how cultural immersion in remote Aboriginal communities influenced medical students' career intentions. Methodology: An academic GP registrar (AB) interviewed 15 medical students who participated in the Adelaide Medical Students' Society Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) Exchange. This program was coordinated by medical student volunteers in collaboration with the Ngaanyatjarra Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Women's Council (NPYWC). The following questions were specifically addressed: 'How does being a guest in a remote Aboriginal community influence medical students' attitudes towards Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care?' and 'Does exposure to Aboriginal communities increase medical students' willingness to pursue careers in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, rural and remote medicine and/or general practice?'. Results: Interest in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care increased from 73% of participants pre-trip to 100% post-trip, in rural and remote medicine from 40% to 100%, and in general practice from 33% to 67%. The experience also challenged pre-conceptions and increased understanding of the bio-psycho-socio-spiritual aspects of Aboriginal health. Conclusion: Being a guest in remote Aboriginal communities enhanced students' personal and professional motivation to work in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, remote health and general practice.
Description: Cairns & Hinterland Hospital and Health Service (CHHHS) affiliated author: Jessica Mitchell
DOI: 10.1071/PY21120
Type: Article
Appears in Sites:Cairns & Hinterland HHS Publications

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