Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://dora.health.qld.gov.au/qldresearchjspui/handle/1/1738
Title: Human T-cell leukaemia virus type 1 and Adult T-cell leukaemia/lymphoma in Queensland, Australia: a retrospective cross-sectional study
Authors: Martin, Fabiola
Gilks, Charles F
Gibb, Robert
Jenkins, Alana
Protani, Melinda
Francis, Fleur
Redmond, Andrew M
Neilsen, Graham
Mudge, David 
Wolley, Martin 
Binotto, Enzo 
Norton, Robert 
Nimmo, Graeme R 
Heney, Claire 
Issue Date: 2022
Publisher: BMJ Journals
Source: Martin F, Gilks CF, Gibb R, et alHuman T-cell leukaemia virus type 1 and Adult T-cell leukaemia/lymphoma in Queensland, Australia: a retrospective cross-sectional studySexually Transmitted Infections Published Online First: 06 May 2022. doi: 10.1136/sextrans-2021-055241
Journal: Sexually transmitted infections
Abstract: Human T-cell leukaemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), an STI, is reported to be highly prevalent in Indigenous communities in Central Australia. HTLV-1 is an incurable, chronic infection which can cause Adult T-cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATL). ATL is associated with high morbidity and mortality, with limited treatment options. We studied the prevalence of HTLV-1 and ATL in the state of Queensland, Australia. Serum samples stored at healthcare services in Brisbane, Townsville and Cairns and at haemodialysis units in Brisbane (2018-2019) were screened for HTLV-1/2 antibodies using the Abbott ARCHITECT chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay (CMIA) for antibodies against gp46-I, gp46-II and GD21 (Abbott CMIA, ARCHITECT). Reactive samples were confirmed through Western blot. Pooled Australian National Cancer Registry surveillance data reporting on cases coded for ATL (2004-2015) were analysed. Two out of 2000 hospital and health services samples were confirmed HTLV-1-positive (0.1%, 95% CI 0.02% to 0.4%), both in older women, one Indigenous and one non-Indigenous. All 540 haemodialysis samples tested negative for HTLV. All samples were HTLV-2-negative. Ten out of 42 (24.8%) reported cases of ATL in Australia were from Queensland (crude incidence rate 0.025/100 000; 95% CI 0.011 to 0.045); most cases were seen in adult men of non-Indigenous origin. Nineteen deaths due to ATL were recorded in Australia. We confirm that HTLV-1 and ATL were detected in Queensland in Indigenous and non-Indigenous people. These results highlight the need for HTLV-1 prevalence studies in populations at risk of STIs to allow the implementation of focused public health sexual and mother-to-child transmission prevention strategies.
Description: Cairns & Hinterland Hospital and Health Service (CHHHS) affiliated author: Enzo Binotto
DOI: 10.1136/sextrans-2021-055241
Type: Article
Appears in Sites:Cairns & Hinterland HHS Publications

Show full item record

Page view(s)

20
checked on Dec 10, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DORA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.